Category Archives: Inspiration

Kick New Year’s Resolutions in the Butt

We may not be Olympic calibre athletes, but we all have accomplishments for 2016 we can be proud of. Many of us tend to focus on the times we fell short of our objectives and forget our achievements.

Our preoccupation with negative events or outcomes is human nature. In their excellent book “Switch; How to Change Things When Change is Hard”, authors Chip and Dan Heath examine relevant psychological research. They conclude in almost all areas of life, “we seem wired to focus on the negative”.  We dwell on the negative, ignoring the positive.

Unfortunately, running is no exception.

Top Seven Tips for Staying Motivated To Run and Train

Exhaustion2snThe preparation period for an event or performance several months in duration (e.g. a race or theatrical show) can be divided into three segments: Honeymoon, Serious Business and Light at the End of the Tunnel.  (Bennett was in a production of Grease.  That’s a different issue altogether).

Runners training now for a fall race (or spring race if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere) are into the Serious Business.  The initial excitement has long worn off.  But you can’t yet see the light at the end of the tunnel.  You’re into some tough physical and mental slogging.  It is at this point where motivation frequently wanes.

Here are seven tips to rally the mental troops, kick your drive up a notch and stay on track (#3 is our fave):

Running for Hope

by Annabelle DeGouveia

My marathon story began in 2003.  As a mother of two boys under 4, I was a casual runner.  I would run for fitness, run when I was stressed and sometimes when I really just felt like running away!  In 2002, my husband who was also a casual runner told me he was going to run a half-marathon.  “Damn, I’m jealous “, I thought.  But later changed that to, “Why can’t I do that?  Before I knew it, we had both completed two half-marathons that year, Toronto and Scotiabank.

By spring 2003, I was ready to try again and ran the Burlington Half.  Despite my love of running and of the excitement of race day, I remember looking at the marathoners, still running long after I had finished my post race bagel and thought, “Damn, they’re crazy!.   But, that soon changed.

At my local running store, I found myself perusing the brochures and flyers of upcoming races when a young staff member asked if I needed help.  “Oh, not me, these marathons aren’t for me.”  He looked at me and simply asked the right question, “Why can’t you do that?” And before I knew it, (and after a few glasses of red wine), I was registering for the Scotiabank Marathon that September.

Take Pride in Your 2014 Accomplishments

We may not be Olympic calibre athletes, but we all have accomplishments for 2014 we can be proud of. Many of us tend to focus on the times we fell short of our objectives and forget our achievements.

Our preoccupation with negative events or outcomes is human nature. In their excellent book “Switch; How to Change Things When Change is Hard”, authors Chip and Dan Heath examine relevant psychological research. They conclude in almost all areas of life, “we seem wired to focus on the negative”.  We dwell on the negative, ignoring the positive.

Unfortunately, running is no exception.

Motivation on Tap

FieldRunnersm“Running is the chance to become a hero in your own life”- Kathrine Switzer

“Strive for continuous improvement, not perfection.” – Kim Collins

“It doesn’t get easier – you get stronger!”

“Your body will argue that there is no justifiable reason to continue. Your only recourse is to call on your spirit which fortunately functions independently of logic.” – Tim Noakes

You Let a Girl Beat You?

LetaGirlBeatYouby Dr. George Sheehan
(reprinted with permission)

(Ed note: Dr. George Sheehan was running’s first and foremost philosopher.  Until he started writing in the 1970’s, running’s writers focused on either elite runners or running as effective means to get in shape.  Sheehan wrote about running as a way of life, the road to self-improvement.  Reading Sheehan’s seminal book “Running & Being” cemented Bennett’s lifelong commitment to running.

Although Dr. Sheehan was a traditional and religious man (he had 12 children, all with the same wife), his views on women runners were extremely progressive. His 1976 essay “You Let a Girl Beat You?” contains many nuggets of wisdom, most of which are still applicable today).

As soon as the race results appear in the paper, I hear the same old comments in the hospital where I work: “I see you let a girl beat you.” The statement is wrong on all counts; wrong in what it says; wrong in what it implies.

For one thing, these runners are not girls but women. Anyone who has had their consciousness raised knows better than to call a woman a girl, and it is about time everyone learned that.

The Runner’s Soul

Your Own Personal Podium:
How to Get Back Up When You’ve Slipped Off
by Sandie Orlando

Running is a sport that allows us to define our own “personal podium” for success.  It doesn’t matter if we’re looking to complete a mile without stopping, take 10 minutes off our half marathon time or re-qualify for Boston at Boston. The potential to reach goals that result in us proudly ascending our own personal podium is an important part of what gets us out the door most days. Some days, just getting out the door is enough in itself to qualify!

So what happens when we slip – or crash – off?

If You Want to Get Mad, Read This

Last week, Bennett came across an article “Why (Most) Women Shouldn’t Run” by strength coach Michael Boyle.  You can access it from a link on the KatieRunsThis running blog.

Putting anger and indignation aside, let’s stick to an objective rebuttal.

Boyle’s conclusion is plain incorrect, as is the basis of his argument.  About the only thing he says that is 100% true is that elite female distance runners have narrow hips and small breasts.

So what? Saying that women who do not possess this body type should not run is like saying that people who aren’t extremely tall should not play basketball.

I Ran To Work Today

by Kimberly Kane

I ran to work today.
And so I started my day on the right foot.

I ran to work today.
I began my journey in the dark, cloaked in fog that settled on my clothes and eyelashes and ran through a beautiful sunrise.

I ran to work today.
The stop lights were kind to me and my legs were light allowing me to set a new PB for the “commute race”.

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